Excel DCOUNT Function

What is DCOUNT Function in Excel?


The DCOUNT function is one of the Database functions of Excel.

It counts the cells containing numbers in the field (column) of records in the database that match the conditions you specify.

We can find this function in the Database of the insert function Tab.

How to use DCOUNT function in excel

  1. Click on an empty cell (like F5 )
Click on an empty cell

2. Click on the fx icon (or press shift+F3)

Click on the fx icon

3. In insert function tab you will see all functions

insert function tab

4. Select Database category

5. Select DCOUNT function

6. Then select ok

7. In the function arguments Tab you will see DCOUNT function

8. In the Database section you can enter the range of cells that makes up the list or database. A database is a list of related data (ex: Table1)

9. Field section is either the label of the column in double quotation marks or a number that represents the column’s position in the list (ex: C1)

10. Criteria section is the range of cells that contains the conditions you specify. The range includes a column label and one cell below the label for a condition (ex: Table1)

11. You will see the result in formula result section

How to use DCOUNT function in excel

Examples of DCOUNT function in excel

Example1:

calculate the number of student age=29 with DCOUNT function in excel

=DCOUNT (Table3[#All],"Age",B1:B2)----->>>>answer is  2

Example2:

calculate the number of student Weight=231 with DCOUNT function in excel

=DCOUNT (Table3[#All],"Weight",D1:D2)----->>>>answer is  1

Example3:

Calculate the number of Names include “n” with DCOUNT function in excel

we can use “*n” sign to find names that include “n”.

=DCOUNT (Table3[#All],"age",A1:D2)----->>>>answer is  4

Example4:

Calculate the number of Names begins with “n” by DCOUNT function in excel

we can use “n*” sign to find names that begins with “n”.

=DCOUNT (Table3[#All],"age",A1:D2)----->>>>answer is  3

Example 5:

Calculate the number of Row that is not blank by DCOUNT function in excel

we can use “<>” sign to find numbers of Row that is not blank .

=DCOUNT (Table3[#All],"age",A1:D2)----->>>>answer is  9

Example 6:

Calculate the number of persons that “age>27” by DCOUNT function in excel

we can use “>27” sign to find numbers of persons that “age>27” .

=DCOUNT (Table3[#All],"age",A1:D2)----->>>>answer is  2

Example 7:

Python code for DCOUNT function

NameAgeHeightWeight
Olivia25210180
Noah25205235
Oliver27195205
Elijah22198185
James29199231
William29201240
Benjamin21202235
Lucas25200238
Henry22204190
import pandas as pd

df=pd.read_csv(‘example.csv’)

dfheight=df[‘Height’]

dfweight=df[‘Weight’]

dfage=df[‘Age’]

dfage=dfage >22

dfheight=dfheight >200

dfweight=dfweight >185

result=dfage *dfheight *dfweight

result=result.sum(axis=0)

print(result)

What is the purpose of DCOUNT function?

It counts the cells containing numbers in the field (column) of records in the database that match the conditions you specify.

What is the Return value  of DCOUNT function?

output of DCOUNT function just is number.

DCOUNT (database, field, criteria)=number

How many arguments does DCOUNT function have?

DCOUNT(database, field, criteria)

DCOUNT function has 3 arguments.

  • In the Database section you can enter the range of cells that make up the list or database
  • Field section is either the label of the column in double quotation marks
  • Criteria section is the range of cells that contains the conditions you specify

Which version of excel supports DCOUNT function?

This function is available for all excel versions (2003-2019)

Errors in DCOUNT function

If the column title is not a numeric variable, it will give false results

=DCOUNT(Table3[#All],"Name",A1:D2)

In this case,we should use DCOUNTA function.

Conditions and criteria range in DCOUNT function

we can define any range for the criteria argument: it has 2 condition

1. It includes at least one column label

2. It includes at least one cell under the column label.

For example, if the range A1:A2 contains “Name” in A1 and “Benjamin” in A2,

you could define A1=”Name” & A2=”Benjamin”

DCOUNT function find the word of “Benjamin” under “name” column

Criteria argument in DCOUNT function

Although the criteria range can be located anywhere on the worksheet, do not place the criteria range below the list.

If you add more information to the list, the new information is added to the first row below the list.

If the row below the list is not blank, Microsoft Excel cannot add the new information.

Make sure that the criteria range does not overlap the list.

To perform an operation on an entire column in a database, enter a blank line below the column labels in the criteria range.

Examples of DCOUNT function in Excel

  1. Count the number of orders for a specific product from a table named “Orders”:
=DCOUNT(Orders,"Order ID",{"Product","Apples"})
  1. Count the number of customers who have bought more than 10 items from a table named “Orders”:
=DCOUNT(Orders,"Customer ID",{"# Items",">10"})
  1. Count the number of employees who were hired in a specific month from a table named “Employees”:
=DCOUNT(Employees,"Employee ID","Hire Month",{"January"})
  1. Count the number of students who scored more than 80 in a test from a table named “Scores”:
=DCOUNT(Scores,"Student ID",{"Score",">80"})
  1. Count the number of sales made by a specific salesperson from a table named “Sales”:
=DCOUNT(Sales,"Sale ID","Salesperson",{"John Smith"})
  1. Count the number of customers who live in a specific city from a table named “Customers”:
=DCOUNT(Customers,"Customer ID",{"City","New York"})
  1. Count the number of products that are out of stock from a table named “Inventory”:
=DCOUNT(Inventory,"Product ID","Quantity",{"<1"})
  1. Count the number of employees who have an annual salary greater than $50,000 from a table named “Employees”:
=DCOUNT(Employees,"Employee ID",{"Salary",">50000"})
  1. Count the number of orders placed on a specific date from a table named “Orders”:
=DCOUNT(Orders,"Order ID","Order Date",{"01/01/2023"})
  1. Count the number of customers who have made a purchase in the last 30 days from a table named “Orders”:
=DCOUNT(Orders,"Customer ID","Order Date",{"<="&TODAY(),"-30"})

What is the syntax of the DCOUNT function?

The DCOUNT function is used to count the number of records in a database that meet certain criteria.

It takes three arguments:

  1. database: This is the range or table that contains the database you want to search through.
  2. field: This is the column or field in the database you want to count values from.
  3. criteria: This is a range or array that sets the conditions for which records to include in the count.

The syntax for the DCOUNT function is as follows:

=DCOUNT(database, field, criteria)

Here’s a breakdown of each argument:

  1. database: This is the range or table that contains the database you want to search through. For example, if your database is in cells A1:D100, you would enter “A1:D100” as the database argument.
  2. field: This is the column or field in the database you want to count values from. You can refer to the field either by its column letter (e.g. “C”) or its name if it has been defined (e.g. “Product”). For example, if you want to count the number of orders, you would enter “Order ID” as the field argument.
  3. criteria: This is a range or array that sets the conditions for which records to include in the count. You can specify one or more criteria in the form of an array with two or three elements. The first element specifies the field or column to check against, the second element specifies the condition or operator to use, and the third element (if present) specifies the value to compare against.

For example, if you want to count the number of orders for a specific product (e.g. Apples), you could use the following criteria:

{"Product","Apples"}

Alternatively, if you want to count the number of orders for a specific product that were shipped to a specific state (e.g. California), you could use the following criteria:

{"Product","Apples";"State","California"}

Here is an example of the DCOUNT function in action:

Suppose you have a database of orders containing the fields “Order ID”, “Customer Name”, “Product”, “Quantity”, and “Price”. You want to count the number of orders for the product “Apples”.

  1. Select a cell where you want the result to appear.
  2. Enter the following formula:




=DCOUNT(A1:E100,"Order ID",{"Product","Apples"})
  1. Press Enter.

The result will be the total number of orders for Apples that meet the specified criteria.

What is the purpose of the DCOUNT function?

The DCOUNT function is used to count the number of records in a database that meet certain criteria.

It allows you to perform a count operation on a specified field or column within a database table while applying filtering conditions to the data.

This makes it a powerful tool for analyzing and summarizing large amounts of data.

The function takes three arguments: database, field, and criteria. The database argument refers to the range or table that contains the database you want to search through.

The field argument refers to the column or field in the database you want to count values from.

Finally, the criteria argument specifies the conditions that must be met for a record to be included in the count.

Here’s an example to illustrate its purpose:

Suppose you have a database containing customer orders with fields such as “Order ID”, “Customer Name”, “Product”, “Quantity”, “Price”, and “Order Date”.

You want to know the number of orders for a specific product (e.g. Apples) that were placed in a specific month (e.g. January).

To do this, you could use the DCOUNT function as follows:





=DCOUNT(A1:F100,"Order ID",{"Product","Apples";"Order Date",">=01/01/2023","Order Date","<=01/31/2023"})

This formula counts the number of orders for apples that were placed in January 2023 according to the specified criteria.

It searches the range A1:F100 for the “Order ID” column, applies the filter criteria {“Product”,”Apples”;”Order Date”,”>=01/01/2023″,”Order Date”,”<=01/31/2023″}, and returns the count of matching records.

How do I use the DCOUNT function to count filtered data in Excel?

The DCOUNT function is a powerful tool for counting records in a database table based on specified criteria.

It can also be used to count filtered data, which is particularly useful when working with large datasets.

To count filtered data using the DCOUNT function, you need to specify the filter criteria in the criteria argument of the function.

This allows you to count only those records that meet the specified criteria, even if the data has been filtered using Excel’s built-in filtering tools.

Here’s an example to illustrate how to use the DCOUNT function to count filtered data:

Suppose you have a database containing customer orders with fields such as “Order ID”, “Customer Name”, “Product”, “Quantity”, “Price”, and “Order Date”.

You have applied a filter to the data to show only orders for a specific product (e.g. Apples) and want to know the total number of orders for that product.

To do this, you could use the following formula:





=DCOUNT(A1:F100,"Order ID","Product = 'Apples'")

Can the DCOUNT function count based on multiple criteria?

Yes, the DCOUNT function can count based on multiple criteria in Excel.

By specifying more than one filter condition in the criteria argument of the function, you can count only those records that meet all of the specified criteria.

Here’s an example to illustrate how to use the DCOUNT function to count based on multiple criteria:

Suppose you have a database containing customer orders with fields such as “Order ID”, “Customer Name”, “Product”, “Quantity”, “Price”, and “Order Date”.

You want to know the number of orders for a specific product (e.g. Apples) that were placed in a specific month (e.g. January).

To do this, you could use the following formula:





=DCOUNT(A1:F100,"Order ID",{"Product","Apples";"Order Date",">=01/01/2023","Order Date","<=01/31/2023"})

This formula counts the number of orders for Apples that were placed in January 2023 according to the specified criteria.

The criteria argument {“Product”,”Apples”;”Order Date”,”>=01/01/2023″,”Order Date”,”<=01/31/2023″} consists of three pairs of filter conditions:

  1. {“Product”,”Apples”} specifies that the product must be Apples.
  2. {“Order Date”,”>=01/01/2023″} specifies that the order date must be on or after January 1st, 2023.
  3. {“Order Date”,”<=01/31/2023″} specifies that the order date must be on or before January 31st, 2023.

The DCOUNT function will count only those records that meet all of the specified criteria, returning the total number of matching orders.

What happens if there are no matching records for the DCOUNT function?

If there are no matching records for the DCOUNT function in Excel, it will return a value of zero.

This means that if there are no records in the specified database that meet the criteria specified in the DCOUNT function, the function will not count any records and will return a value of zero.

The zero value indicates that there were no matches found based on the search criteria specified in the formula.

Here’s an example to illustrate what happens if there are no matching records:

Suppose you have a database containing customer orders with fields such as “Order ID”, “Customer Name”, “Product”, “Quantity”, “Price”, and “Order Date”.

You want to know the number of orders for a specific product (e.g. Pears) that were placed in a specific month (e.g. January).

To do this, you could use the following formula:





=DCOUNT(A1:F100,"Order ID",{"Product","Pears";"Order Date",">=01/01/2023","Order Date","<=01/31/2023"})

If there are no orders for pears in January 2023, the DCOUNT function will return a value of zero.

This indicates that there were no matching records found in the database that met the specified criteria.

It is important to note that if the criteria argument is left blank or contains an error, the DCOUNT function will return the total number of records in the database.

This can be misleading and result in incorrect calculations, so it’s important to ensure that the criteria argument is properly defined and accurately reflects the desired filtering conditions.

Does the DCOUNT function count duplicate values?

the DCOUNT function in Excel can count duplicate values in a database. By default, the DCOUNT function counts each record that matches the specified criteria, including duplicates.

Here’s an example to illustrate how the DCOUNT function counts duplicate values:

Suppose you have a database containing customer orders with fields such as “Order ID”, “Customer Name”, “Product”, “Quantity”, “Price”, and “Order Date”.

You want to know the number of orders for a specific product (e.g. Apples) that were placed on a specific date (e.g. January 1st, 2023).

To do this, you could use the following formula:





=DCOUNT(A1:F100,"Order ID",{"Product","Apples";"Order Date","=01/01/2023"})

This formula will count all orders for Apples that were placed on January 1st, 2023, even if there are multiple orders with the same Order ID.

This means that if there are two orders for Apples placed on January 1st, 2023, the DCOUNT function will count both of them.

If you want to exclude duplicate values from the count, you can use the DCOUNTA function instead.

The DCOUNTA function works in the same way as the DCOUNT function, but it counts only unique records based on the specified criteria.

Here’s an example to illustrate how the DCOUNTA function works:

Suppose you have a database containing customer orders with fields such as “Order ID”, “Customer Name”, “Product”, “Quantity”, “Price”, and “Order Date”.

You want to know the number of unique customers who ordered a specific product (e.g. Bananas) in a specific month (e.g. January).

To do this, you could use the following formula:

=DCOUNTA(A1:F100,"Customer Name",{"Product","Bananas";"Order Date",">=01/01/2023","Order Date","<=01/31/2023"})

How can I use the DCOUNT function with wildcard characters?

The DCOUNT function in Excel is used to count the number of cells that contain numbers within a database based on specified criteria.

It allows you to specify one or more conditions using comparison operators (=, <>, <, >, <=, >=) to filter the data in the database.

In addition, you can also use wildcard characters with the DCOUNT function to match patterns within the data.

Wildcard characters are special characters that can be used in search queries to represent any character or group of characters.

The two most commonly used wildcard characters in Excel are the asterisk (*) and question mark (?).

The asterisk (*) represents zero or more characters, while the question mark (?) represents a single character.

These characters can be used in combination with other characters to match specific patterns within the data in the database.

Here’s an example to illustrate how to use the DCOUNT function with wildcard characters:

Suppose you have a database containing customer information with fields such as “Customer ID”, “Name”, “Email Address”, and “Phone Number”.

You want to know the number of customers whose email addresses end with “.com”.

To do this, you can use the following formula:





=DCOUNT(A1:D100,"Customer ID","Email Address","*\.com")

In this formula, the first argument (A1:D100) specifies the range of cells that contains the database.

The second argument (“Customer ID”) specifies the field that contains the unique identifier for each record. The third argument (“Email Address”) specifies the field that contains the email addresses of the customers.

The fourth argument (“.com”) specifies the criteria for matching the email addresses. The asterisk () represents zero or more characters before the “.com” suffix, and the backslash () is used to escape the period (.) character, which is a wildcard character that matches any single character.

Therefore, this formula will count all records where the “Email Address” field ends with “.com”, regardless of the characters that precede it.

Here’s another example to illustrate how to use the DCOUNT function with wildcard characters:

Suppose you have a database containing product information with fields such as “Product ID”, “Product Name”, “Description”, and “Price”.

You want to know the number of products whose names contain the word “apple”.

To do this, you can use the following formula:





=DCOUNT(A1:D100,"Product ID","Product Name","*apple*")

In this formula, the first argument (A1:D100) specifies the range of cells that contains the database.

The second argument (“Product ID”) specifies the field that contains the unique identifier for each record. The third argument (“Product Name”) specifies the field that contains the names of the products.

The fourth argument (“apple“) specifies the criteria for matching the product names. The asterisk (*) represents zero or more characters before and after the word “apple”, which is enclosed in quotation marks.

This formula will count all records where the “Product Name” field contains the word “apple” anywhere within the text.

Can I use the DCOUNT function to count unique values?

The DCOUNT function in Excel is commonly used to count the number of cells that contain numbers within a database based on specified criteria.

By default, it counts all records that match the specified criteria, including duplicates. However, you can also use the DCOUNT function to count unique values by specifying a unique identifier for each record.

To count unique values using the DCOUNT function, you need to include an additional argument that specifies the field containing the unique identifier for each record.

This field should contain a value that is unique for each record in the database, such as an ID number or a combination of fields.

Here’s an example to illustrate how to use the DCOUNT function to count unique values:

Suppose you have a database containing customer orders with fields such as “Order ID”, “Customer Name”, “Product”, “Quantity”, “Price”, and “Order Date”.

You want to know the number of unique customers who placed orders for a specific product (e.g. Apples) during a specific month (e.g. January).

To do this, you can use the following formula:





=DCOUNT(A1:F100,"Order ID","Product","Apples","Order Date",">=01/01/2023","Order Date","<=01/31/2023")

In this formula, the first argument (A1:F100) specifies the range of cells that contains the database. The second argument (“Order ID”) specifies the field that contains the unique identifier for each order.

The third argument (“Product”) specifies the field that contains the product name.

The remaining arguments specify the criteria for filtering the data based on the product name and the order date range. The last two arguments specify the start and end dates for the order date range.

By specifying the “Order ID” field as the unique identifier, this formula will count the number of unique orders for Apples that were placed during January 2023, regardless of the number of times each customer ordered Apples during that month.

Here’s another example to illustrate how to use the DCOUNT function to count unique values:

Suppose you have a database containing employee information with fields such as “Employee ID”, “Name”, “Department”, and “Salary”.

You want to know the number of unique employees who work in a specific department (e.g. Sales) and earn more than a certain salary amount (e.g. $50,000).

To do this, you can use the following formula:





=DCOUNT(A1:D100,"Employee ID","Department","Sales","Salary",">50000")

In this formula, the first argument (A1:D100) specifies the range of cells that contains the database.

The second argument (“Employee ID”) specifies the field that contains the unique identifier for each employee. The third argument (“Department”) specifies the field that contains the department name.

The remaining arguments specify the criteria for filtering the data based on the department name and the salary amount.

The last argument specifies the minimum salary amount required by the filter.

By specifying the “Employee ID” field as the unique identifier, this formula will count the number of unique employees who work in the Sales department and earn more than $50,000 per year.

Is the DCOUNT function case-sensitive?

In Excel, the DCOUNT function is case-insensitive by default. This means that it will treat uppercase and lowercase letters as identical when comparing strings.

The DCOUNT function is used to count the number of cells in a database that meet certain criteria.

It takes three arguments: the database range, the field to count, and the criteria range. The field to count argument can be specified either by column number or by column label.

For example, consider the following database:

NameAgeGender
John Doe25Male
Jane Doe30Female
Bob Smith40Male

Suppose we want to count the number of males in this database. We could use the DCOUNT function as follows:

=DCOUNT(A1:C4,"Gender",A6:B7)

Here, A1:C4 represents the database range, “Gender” specifies the field to count (which is column C), and A6:B7 contains the criteria range with the condition “Male” in cell B7.

The result of this formula would be 2, since there are two males in the database.

Note that the DCOUNT function treats “Male” and “male” as equivalent, so it would count both instances regardless of the case.

However, if you do want to perform a case-sensitive comparison, you can use the DCOUNTA function instead.

This function behaves similarly to DCOUNT, but considers uppercase and lowercase letters to be distinct. For example:

=DCOUNTA(A1:C4,"Gender",A6:B7)

This formula would only count cells where the gender is spelled exactly as “Male” with an uppercase M. If there were any instances of “male” with a lowercase m, they would not be counted.

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