Excel DEC2OCT Function

What is DEC2OCT function in Excel?


The DEC2OCT function is one of the Engineering functions of Excel.

It Converts a decimal number to an octal.

We can find this function in Engineering of insert function Tab.

How to use DEC2OCT function in excel

  1. Click on an empty cell (like F5).
an empty cell in excel

2. Click on the fx icon (or press shift+F3).

fx icon in excel

3. In the insert function tab you will see all functions.

function tab in excel

4. Select ENGINEERING category.

5. Select DEC2OCT function

6. Then select ok.

7. In the function arguments Tab you will see DEC2OCT function.

8. Number section is the decimal integer you want to convert.

9. Places section is the number of characters to use.

10. You will see the results in the formula result section.

Examples of DEC2OCT function in Excel

  1. To convert the decimal number 25 to octal, use the formula: =DEC2OCT(25) which will return the result as “31”.
  2. To convert the decimal number 125 to octal, use the formula: =DEC2OCT(125) which will return the result as “175”.
  3. To convert the decimal number 1024 to octal, use the formula: =DEC2OCT(1024) which will return the result as “2000”.
  4. To convert the decimal number 4096 to octal, use the formula: =DEC2OCT(4096) which will return the result as “10000”.
  5. To convert the decimal number 654321 to octal, use the formula: =DEC2OCT(654321) which will return the result as “2342511”.
  6. To convert the decimal number 123456789 to octal, use the formula: =DEC2OCT(123456789) which will return the result as “726746425”.
  7. To convert the decimal number 987654321 to octal, use the formula: =DEC2OCT(987654321) which will return the result as “35274463111”.
  8. To convert the decimal number 2147483647 to octal, use the formula: =DEC2OCT(2147483647) which will return the result as “17777777777”.
  9. To convert the decimal number 4294967295 to octal, use the formula: =DEC2OCT(4294967295) which will return the result as “37777777777”.
  10. To convert the decimal number 9223372036854775807 to octal, use the formula: =DEC2OCT(9223372036854775807) which will return the result as “777777777777777777777”.

Example 1:

How to use DEC2OCT function in excel

You can see examples of DEC2OCT function below:

dec2oct(A2,B2) ----->>>>answer is  0000

dec2oct(A3,B3) ----->>>>answer is  0002

dec2oct(A4,B4) ----->>>>answer is  0004

dec2oct(A5,B5) ----->>>>answer is  0010

dec2oct(A6,B6) ----->>>>answer is  0020

dec2oct(A7,B7) ----->>>>answer is  0040

Excel’s DEC2OCT function: What is it and how does it work?

The DEC2OCT function in Excel is a mathematical function that converts a decimal number to an octal (base-8) number. It takes a decimal input and returns the corresponding octal number. The function is useful in computer programming, where octal numbers are used to represent binary values.

For example, suppose you have the decimal value 10. Using the DEC2OCT function, Excel can convert this to its octal equivalent, which is 12.

Using Excel’s DEC2OCT function: A step-by-step guide

To use the DEC2OCT function in Excel:

  1. Open a new or existing Excel worksheet.
  2. Select the cell where you want to display the result of the function.
  3. Type “=DEC2OCT(” followed by the decimal value you want to convert.
  4. Close the parentheses and press enter.

For example, to convert the decimal value 50 to octal, you would type “=DEC2OCT(50)” into a cell and press enter. Excel will return the octal value “62”.

Understanding the syntax of Excel’s DEC2OCT function

The syntax for the DEC2OCT function in Excel is as follows:

=DEC2OCT(number,[places])

The “number” argument represents the decimal value that you want to convert to octal. This argument is required.

The “places” argument is optional and represents the minimum number of characters that should be displayed in the resulting octal value. If omitted, Excel will display only the necessary characters.

DEC2OCT function in Excel: What does the ‘number’ argument represent?

The “number” argument in Excel’s DEC2OCT function represents the decimal value that you want to convert to octal. This argument is required and can be a cell reference or a numerical value.

For example, if you have the decimal value 25 in cell A1 and you want to convert it to octal using the DEC2OCT function, you would use the formula “=DEC2OCT(A1)”. Excel will return the octal value “31”.

Excel’s DEC2OCT function: Explaining the ‘places’ argument

The ‘places’ argument in the Excel DEC2OCT function is an optional argument that specifies the minimum number of characters that should be displayed in the resulting octal value. If omitted, Excel will display only the necessary characters. This argument can be useful when a specific number of digits is required in the final output.

For example, if you want the output to always have at least 4 digits, you could use the formula “=DEC2OCT(10,4)” which would return “0012”.

What is the maximum number that can be converted using Excel’s DEC2OCT function?

The maximum decimal number that can be converted using Excel’s DEC2OCT function is 536,870,911 (7FFFFFFF in hexadecimal). Any values higher than this will result in a #NUM! error.

For example, attempting to convert the value 536,870,912 will result in a #NUM! error because it exceeds the maximum value allowed by the function.

Can negative numbers be converted with Excel’s DEC2OCT function?

Yes, negative decimal numbers can be converted to their corresponding octal values using Excel’s DEC2OCT function. The resulting octal value will start with a minus sign (-) to indicate that it is a negative value.

For example, if you want to convert the decimal value -10 to its octal equivalent, you would use the formula “=DEC2OCT(-10)” which would return “-12”.

Converting decimal to octal numbers in Excel without using the DEC2OCT function

It is possible to convert decimal numbers to octal numbers in Excel without using the DEC2OCT function. One way to do this is to use a combination of other functions such as MOD and INT.

For example, to convert the decimal value 35 to its octal equivalent, you could use the formula “=INT(35/8)&MOD(35,8)” which would return “43”. In this example, the INT function returns the quotient of 35 divided by 8 (which is 4) and the MOD function returns the remainder of 35 divided by 8 (which is 3). The two functions are concatenated together using the “&” operator to create the final output.

How to convert octal numbers back to decimal in Excel

To convert an octal number back to its decimal equivalent in Excel, you can use the OCT2DEC function. The OCT2DEC function takes an octal number as its argument and returns the corresponding decimal value.

For example, if you have the octal value “14” and you want to convert it to decimal, you would use the formula “=OCT2DEC(14)” which would return 12.

DEC2OCT function in Excel: What happens if ‘number’ argument isn’t decimal?

If the ‘number’ argument provided in the DEC2OCT function is not a decimal value, Excel will return a #VALUE! error. This is because the function requires a decimal input in order to perform the conversion to octal.

For example, attempting to convert the text value “Hello” using the DEC2OCT function would result in a #VALUE! error.

Using non-integer numbers with Excel’s DEC2OCT function

The DEC2OCT function in Excel only works with integer values. If you attempt to use a non-integer value as the ‘number’ argument, Excel will round the number down to the nearest integer before performing the conversion.

For example, if you want to convert the value 10.5 to its octal equivalent using the DEC2OCT function, Excel will automatically round the value down to 10 before performing the conversion.

Using the DEC2OCT function in an array formula in Excel

The DEC2OCT function can be used as part of an array formula in Excel. An array formula is a formula that performs calculations on multiple sets of values at the same time. To use the DEC2OCT function in an array formula, simply enter the formula as you would normally and then press Ctrl + Shift + Enter instead of just Enter.

For example, if you have a range of decimal values in cells A1:A5 and you want to convert them all to octal using the DEC2OCT function, you could use the following array formula: {=DEC2OCT(A1:A5)}. This would return an array of octal values corresponding to each decimal value in the range.

Formatting output from the DEC2OCT function in Excel

You can format the output from the DEC2OCT function in Excel by using the cell formatting options. To do this, select the cell or range of cells containing the DEC2OCT function, and then right-click and choose “Format Cells”. In the Format Cells dialog box, go to the Number tab and choose “Custom” from the Category list. Then enter a custom number format that includes the appropriate number of digits for your octal values.

For example, if you want to display all octal values with 4 digits, you could use the custom number format “0000”.

Rounding output from the DEC2OCT function in Excel

The DEC2OCT function in Excel does not have an option to round the output. However, you can use other functions such as ROUND or MROUND to round the decimal input value before passing it to the DEC2OCT function.

For example, if you want to convert the decimal value 7.5 to its nearest integer before converting to octal, you could use the formula “=DEC2OCT(ROUND(7.5,0))” which would return “7”.

Converting a range of decimal numbers to octal numbers in Excel

To convert a range of decimal numbers to their corresponding octal numbers in Excel, you can use the DEC2OCT function along with an array formula. Simply enter the formula =DEC2OCT(A1:A5) into a range of cells, but instead of pressing Enter, press Ctrl+Shift+Enter. This will automatically apply the formula to each value in the range.

For example, suppose you have the decimal values 10, 11, 12, 13, and 14 in cells A1:A5. To convert these values to their octal equivalents, you could use the formula {=DEC2OCT(A1:A5)}. This would return an array of octal values corresponding to each decimal value in the range.

Conditional formatting with Excel’s DEC2OCT function

You can use conditional formatting with the output from the DEC2OCT function in Excel to visually highlight certain values. To do this, select the cell or range of cells containing the DEC2OCT function, and then go to the Home tab and choose “Conditional Formatting”. Choose the type of formatting you want to apply based on the value of the cell, and then specify the criteria and formatting options as desired.

For example, if you want to highlight all octal values that start with the digit “7”, you could use the following conditional formatting rule:

  1. Select the cells containing the output of the DEC2OCT function.
  2. Go to Home > Conditional Formatting > New Rule.
  3. Choose “Use a formula to determine which cells to format”.
  4. Enter the formula =LEFT(A1)=”7″ (assuming your data starts in cell A1).
  5. Choose a formatting option for the matched cells.
  6. Click OK.

This will highlight any octal values that start with the digit “7”.

Using the DEC2OCT function in VBA code in Excel

The DEC2OCT function can be used in VBA code in Excel to perform octal conversions programmatically. To use the function in VBA, you can simply call it as you would any other worksheet function.

For example, suppose you want to convert the decimal value 20 to its octal equivalent using VBA code. You could use the following code:





Dim myDecimal As Double
Dim myOctal As String

myDecimal = 20
myOctal = WorksheetFunction.Dec2Oct(myDecimal)

This would store the octal value “24” in the variable “myOctal”.

Combining Excel’s DEC2OCT function with other functions

You can combine Excel’s DEC2OCT function with other functions to perform more complex calculations. For example, you could use the SUM function to add together a range of decimal values and then convert the sum to octal using the DEC2OCT function.

For example, if you have the decimal values 10, 20, and 30 in cells A1:A3 and you want to add them together and display the result as an octal value, you could use the formula “=DEC2OCT(SUM(A1:A3))”. This would return the octal value “74”.

Troubleshooting errors when using the DEC2OCT function in Excel

If you encounter errors when using the DEC2OCT function in Excel, there are several things you can check. First, make sure that the ‘number’ argument is a valid decimal value. If the ‘number’ argument is not a valid decimal value, Excel will return a #VALUE! error. Additionally, make sure that the resulting octal value is within the range of acceptable values (0 through 37777777777). If the resulting octal value is outside this range, Excel will return a #NUM! error.

Common use cases for the DEC2OCT function in Excel

The DEC2OCT function in Excel is commonly used in computer programming, especially when working with binary values. Octal values are often used to represent sets of three bits in binary code. The function can also be useful when working with certain types of data compression algorithms that use octal values. Another common use case is in electronics engineering, where octal numbers are used to represent digital signals.

DEC2OCT related functions 

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