Excel TAN Function

What is TAN function in Excel?

The TAN function is one of the math functions of Excel.

It Returns the tangent of an angle.

We can find this function in Math & trig category of insert function Tab.

How to use TAN function in excel

  1. Click on an empty cell (like F5 )
empty cell

2. Click on fx icon (or press shift+F3)

fx icon in excel

3. In the insert function tab you will see all functions

insert function tab in excel

4. Select math and trig category

5. Select TAN function

6. Then select ok

excel TAN function

7. In the function arguments Tab you will see TAN function

8. Number is the angle in radians for which you want the tangent. Degrees PIO/180 = radians

9. You will see results in the formula result ( TAN pi()/2=1.63)

How to use TAN function in excel

Examples of TAN function in Excel

  1. To calculate the tangent of an angle specified in radians, use the following formula:




=TAN(PI()/4)

This formula calculates the tangent of pi/4 radians, which is equivalent to 45 degrees.

  1. To calculate the tangent of an angle specified in degrees, convert it to radians using the RADIANS function:




=TAN(RADIANS(30))

This formula calculates the tangent of 30 degrees.

  1. To calculate the tangent of a value in another cell, reference that cell in the formula:




=TAN(A1)

Assuming that cell A1 contains a value in radians, this formula calculates its tangent.

  1. To calculate the tangent of a value in another cell specified in degrees, use a combination of the RADIANS and TAN functions:




=TAN(RADIANS(A1))

Assuming that cell A1 contains a value in degrees, this formula converts it to radians and then calculates its tangent.

  1. To calculate the inverse tangent of a value, use the ATAN function:




=ATAN(0.5)

This formula calculates the inverse tangent of 0.5, which is equivalent to approximately 26.57 degrees.

  1. To calculate the hyperbolic tangent of a value, use the TANH function:




=TANH(1)

This formula calculates the hyperbolic tangent of 1.

  1. To calculate the tangent of a complex number, use the IMTAN function:




=IMTAN(A1)

Assuming that cell A1 contains a complex number, this formula calculates its tangent.

  1. To calculate the tangent of multiple angles at once, use an array formula:




{=TAN(A1:A10)}

This formula calculates the tangent of each value in the range A1:A10, and returns an array of results.

  1. To calculate the tangent of a value with a specified number of digits, use the ROUND function:




=ROUND(TAN(PI()/4),2)

This formula calculates the tangent of pi/4 radians and then rounds the result to two decimal places.

  1. To calculate the tangent of a value with a specified number of decimal places displayed, use custom number formatting:




=TAN(PI()/4)

Then, apply a custom number format such as “#.##” to the cell containing the formula to display the result with two decimal places.

Example 1:

How to use TAN function in excel

You can see examples of TAN function below:

Examples of TAN function in Excel
tan(A2) ----->>>>answer is  0

tan(A3) ----->>>>answer is  -1.73

tan(A4) ----->>>>answer is  1

tan(A5) ----->>>>answer is  0.72

tan(A6) ----->>>>answer is  0.57

Excel’s TAN function: An Introduction

The TAN function in Excel is a trigonometric function that calculates the tangent of an angle. It takes an angle as its argument and returns the tangent of that angle. The TAN function is useful when working with right triangles, as it allows you to calculate the length of one side of the triangle based on the size of the other two sides and the angle between them.

How to Use the TAN Function in Excel: A Step-by-Step Guide

To use the TAN function in Excel, follow these steps:

  1. Select the cell where you want to display the result.
  2. Type “=TAN(” in the formula bar.
  3. Enter the angle in radians or degrees (depending on your preference) after the open parenthesis.
  4. Close the parenthesis and press enter.

For example, if you want to find the tangent of 45 degrees, you would type “=TAN(45)” into the formula bar and press enter. The result would be 1.

Exploring the Arguments of the TAN Function in Excel

The TAN function in Excel takes one argument, which is the angle for which you want to calculate the tangent. This angle can be entered in either radians or degrees, depending on your preference.

For example, if you want to find the tangent of an angle of 30 degrees, the argument would be 30 if using degrees, or pi/6 if using radians (since 30 degrees is equivalent to pi/6 radians).

Understanding the Syntax of Excel’s TAN Function

The syntax of Excel’s TAN function is as follows:

=TAN(number)

Here, “number” represents the angle for which you want to calculate the tangent. This argument can be entered in either radians or degrees.

For example, if you want to find the tangent of an angle of 60 degrees, you would enter “=TAN(60)” into the formula bar.

The Result of the TAN Function in Excel: What You Need to Know

The result of the TAN function in Excel is the tangent of the angle you specify. This value can range from negative infinity to positive infinity, since the tangent function has vertical asymptotes at odd multiples of pi/2.

For example, if you enter “=TAN(0)” into a cell in Excel, the result will be 0. If you enter “=TAN(pi/2)”, the result will be undefined.

Avoiding the #DIV/0! Error with Excel’s TAN Function

The #DIV/0! error in Excel occurs when you try to divide a number by zero. This error can occur with the TAN function if you input an angle that is a multiple of pi/2 in radians or 90 degrees in degrees. To avoid this error, you can use an IF statement to check for this condition and return a more appropriate value instead of the error.

For example, if you want to calculate the tangent of an angle of 90 degrees, which would result in a #DIV/0! error, you could use the following formula:





=IF(A1=90,"Undefined",TAN(RADIANS(A1)))

This formula first checks if the angle is 90 degrees. If it is, the formula returns the text “Undefined”. If it isn’t, the formula calculates the tangent of the angle in radians using the TAN function.

Troubleshooting the #VALUE! Error with the TAN Function in Excel

The #VALUE! error in Excel occurs when the input argument of a function is of the wrong data type. This error can occur with the TAN function if you input a non-numeric value as the angle argument. To troubleshoot this error, you can check the input cell to ensure that it contains a valid numeric value.

For example, if you are trying to calculate the tangent of an angle stored in cell A1, but you get a #VALUE! error, you can check the contents of cell A1 to make sure it contains a number.

The #NUM! Error and Excel’s TAN Function: A Guide

The #NUM! error in Excel occurs when a function is unable to calculate a numerical result. This error can occur with the TAN function if you input an angle that is outside of the acceptable range for the function. To troubleshoot this error, you can check that the input angle is within the acceptable range for the TAN function.

For example, if you are trying to calculate the tangent of an angle that is too large to be handled by the TAN function, you will get a #NUM! error. You can check that the input angle is within the acceptable range for the function, which is approximately -1.633E16 to 1.633E16 radians.

Using Excel’s TAN Function with Angles in Degrees

You can use Excel’s TAN function to calculate the tangent of an angle measured in degrees by converting the degrees to radians using the RADIANS function. For example, if you want to find the tangent of an angle of 45 degrees, you would use the following formula:





=TAN(RADIANS(45))

This formula first converts 45 degrees to radians using the RADIANS function and then finds the tangent of the resulting angle using the TAN function.

The TAN Function in Excel: Working with Angles in Radians

Excel’s TAN function can also be used to calculate the tangent of an angle measured in radians. For example, if you want to find the tangent of an angle of pi/4 radians, you would use the following formula:





=TAN(PI()/4)

This formula uses the PI() function to return the value of pi and then divides it by 4 to get pi/4 radians. The TAN function is then used to find the tangent of this angle.

Accuracy and Limitations of the TAN Function in Excel

The accuracy of the TAN function in Excel depends on the precision of the input angle. The function is accurate to approximately 15 decimal places for angles within its acceptable range. However, the function can become inaccurate for very large or very small angles due to limitations in the internal floating-point representation used by Excel.

For example, if you want to calculate the tangent of an angle of 10^-9 radians using Excel’s TAN function, the result may not be completely accurate due to rounding errors associated with the internal floating-point representation.

Excel’s TAN Function: Handling a Range of Values

Excel’s TAN function can handle a range of values for its input angle. The function can accept input angles in both radians and degrees, as well as positive and negative values.

For example, if you want to find the tangent of an angle of -30 degrees, you would use the following formula:





=TAN(RADIANS(-30))

This formula first converts -30 degrees to radians using the RADIANS function and then calculates the tangent of the resulting angle using the TAN function.

Non-Numeric Values and the TAN Function in Excel

If you try to use a non-numeric value as the angle argument for Excel’s TAN function, you will get a #VALUE! error. To avoid this error, ensure that the input angle is a valid numeric value.

For example, if you want to calculate the tangent of an angle stored in cell A1, but cell A1 contains non-numeric text, you will get a #VALUE! error. To fix this error, make sure that cell A1 contains a valid numeric value.

Understanding the Effect of Zero in the TAN Function in Excel

If you enter zero as the input angle for Excel’s TAN function, the result will always be zero. This is because the tangent of zero radians and zero degrees is always zero.

For example, if you want to calculate the tangent of an angle of zero degrees, you would use the following formula:





=TAN(RADIANS(0))

This formula first converts 0 degrees to radians using the RADIANS function and then calculates the tangent of the resulting angle using the TAN function.

Multiples of Pi and the TAN Function in Excel: What Happens?

If you enter an input angle that is a multiple of pi radians (or 180 degrees), the result of Excel’s TAN function will be undefined. This is because the tangent function has vertical asymptotes at odd multiples of pi/2, which means that the function approaches positive or negative infinity as the input angle approaches odd multiples of pi/2.

For example, if you want to calculate the tangent of an angle of pi radians (or 180 degrees), you will get an undefined result. To avoid this error, make sure that the input angle is not a multiple of pi radians (or 180 degrees).

Converting Degrees to Radians in Excel: A Tutorial

Excel’s built-in functions work with angles measured in radians, so it’s often necessary to convert angles measured in degrees to radians. To convert degrees to radians in Excel, you can use the RADIANS function.

For example, suppose you have an angle of 45 degrees stored in cell A1. To convert this angle to radians, you would use the following formula:





=RADIANS(A1)

This formula takes the value stored in cell A1 (which is 45) and converts it to radians using the RADIANS function. The result is approximately 0.7854 radians.

Converting Radians to Degrees in Excel: A Quick Guide

Excel’s built-in functions work with angles measured in radians, but it’s often more convenient to work with angles measured in degrees. To convert radians to degrees in Excel, you can use the DEGREES function.

For example, suppose you have an angle of pi/4 radians stored in cell A1. To convert this angle to degrees, you would use the following formula:





=DEGREES(A1)

This formula takes the value stored in cell A1 (which is pi/4) and converts it to degrees using the DEGREES function. The result is approximately 45 degrees.

Nesting the TAN Function in Other Excel Functions

You can nest the TAN function inside other Excel functions to create more complex calculations. For example, suppose you want to find the tangent of an angle in cell A1, but only if the angle is greater than or equal to zero. You could use the following formula:





=IF(A1>=0,TAN(A1),"Angle must be greater than or equal to zero.")

This formula first checks if the angle in cell A1 is greater than or equal to zero. If it is, the formula calculates the tangent of the angle using the TAN function. If it isn’t, the formula returns the text “Angle must be greater than or equal to zero.”

Using the TAN Function in Conditional Formatting in Excel

You can use the TAN function in conditional formatting to apply different formatting to cells based on their tangent values. For example, suppose you want to highlight cells that have a tangent value greater than or equal to 1. You could use the following steps:

  1. Select the range of cells you want to format.
  2. Click “Conditional Formatting” in the “Home” tab.
  3. Select “New Rule” and then “Use a formula to determine which cells to format.”
  4. Enter the following formula: “=TAN(A1)>=1”
  5. Choose the formatting you want to apply.

This formula checks if the tangent of the value in cell A1 is greater than or equal to 1. If it is, the formatting you selected will be applied to the cell.

Excel’s TAN Function and Array Formulas: A Comprehensive Guide

You can use array formulas with Excel’s TAN function to perform calculations on multiple values at once. For example, suppose you have a range of angles stored in cells A1:A10 and you want to find the tangent of each angle. You could use the following formula:





{=TAN(A1:A10)}

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