Excel FACTDOUBLE Function

What is FACTDOUBLE Function in Excel?

The FACTDOUBLE function is one of the math functions of Excel.

It Returns the double factorial of a number.

We can find this function in Math & trig category of insert function Tab.

Table of Contents

How to use FACTDOUBLE function in excel

  1. Click on an empty cell (like F5 )
empty cell in excell

2. Click on fx icon (or press shift+F3)

fx icon in excel

3. In the insert function tab you will see all functions

insert function tab in excel

4. Select math and trig category

5. Select FACTDOUBLE function

6. Then select ok

excel FACTDOUBLE function

7. In the function arguments Tab you will see FACTDOUBLE function

8. Number is the value for which to return the double factorial

9. You will see results in the formula result section

How to use FACTDOUBLE function in excel

Examples of FACTDOUBLE function in Excel

  1. To find the double factorial of 4, enter =FACTDOUBLE(4) into a cell, which would return the result of 8 (which is equal to 4 x 2).
  2. To find the double factorial of 6, enter =FACTDOUBLE(6) into a cell, which would return the result of 48 (which is equal to 6 x 4 x 2).
  3. To find the double factorial of 7, enter =FACTDOUBLE(7) into a cell, which would return the result of 105 (which is equal to 7 x 5 x 3 x 1).
  4. To find the double factorial of 9, enter =FACTDOUBLE(9) into a cell, which would return the result of 945 (which is equal to 9 x 7 x 5 x 3 x 1).
  5. To find the sum of the double factorials of 4 and 6, enter =SUM(FACTDOUBLE(4), FACTDOUBLE(6)) into a cell, which would return the value of 56 (which is equal to 8 + 48).
  6. To find the product of the double factorials of 5 and 7, enter =PRODUCT(FACTDOUBLE(5), FACTDOUBLE(7)) into a cell, which would return the value of 3150 (which is equal to 15 x 105).
  7. To find the quotient of the double factorials of 8 and 6, enter =QUOTIENT(FACTDOUBLE(8), FACTDOUBLE(6)) into a cell, which would return the value of 12 (which is equal to 384 / 48).
  8. To find the difference between the double factorials of 10 and 8, enter =FACTDOUBLE(10) – FACTDOUBLE(8) into a cell, which would return the value of 8064 (which is equal to 3840 – 576).
  9. To find the double factorial of a number in another cell, such as A1, enter =FACTDOUBLE(A1) into another cell, which will return the double factorial of the value in A1.
  10. To use the double factorial function with negative numbers, you can use the ABS function to convert them to positive numbers first. For example, to find the double factorial of -6, you can use =FACTDOUBLE(ABS(-6)), which would return the result of 48 (which is still equal to 6 x 4 x 2).

Example 1:

How to use FACTDOUBLE function in excel

You can see examples of FACTDOUBLE function below:

Examples of FACTDOUBLE function in Excel
factdouble(5) ----->>>>answer is  15

factdouble(4) ----->>>>answer is  8

factdouble(3) ----->>>>answer is  3

factdouble(1) ----->>>>answer is  1

factdouble(0) ----->>>>answer is  1

Excel’s FACTDOUBLE Function: What You Need to Know

Excel’s FACTDOUBLE function is used to calculate the double factorial of a number. Double factorial is the product of all positive integers that are either odd or even up to a given number. The function doubles every other integer from 1 onwards, such as 135 or 246.

For example, =FACTDOUBLE(8) would return the value of 384 (which is equal to 8 x 6 x 4 x 2).

Comparing Excel’s FACTDOUBLE and FACT Functions: Similarities and Differences

The FACT and FACTDOUBLE functions in Excel both deal with factorials, but their calculations differ. The FACT function calculates the factorial of a number, which is the product of all positive integers up to a given number. The FACTDOUBLE function, on the other hand, calculates the double factorial of a number.

For example, =FACT(5) would return the value of 120 (which is equal to 5 x 4 x 3 x 2 x 1), while =FACTDOUBLE(5) would return the value of 15 (which is equal to 5 x 3 x 1).

How to Use Excel’s FACTDOUBLE Function: A Guide to Syntax and Arguments

The syntax for the FACTDOUBLE function in Excel is =FACTDOUBLE(Number). The argument “Number” is the value for which you want to find the double factorial.

For example, =FACTDOUBLE(6) would return the value of 48 (which is equal to 6 x 4 x 2).

Exploring the Input Values for Excel’s FACTDOUBLE Function

The input values for Excel’s FACTDOUBLE function can include positive integers, zero, and negative odd integers. However, it’s important to note that negative even integers are not valid input values.

For example, =FACTDOUBLE(0) would return the value of 1, while =FACTDOUBLE(-5) would return the value of -15 (which is equal to -5 x -3 x -1).

Negative Numbers and Excel’s FACTDOUBLE Function: What You Should Know

When using negative numbers with Excel’s FACTDOUBLE function, it’s important to keep in mind that the function will only work with negative odd integers. Negative even integers are not valid input values.

For example, =FACTDOUBLE(-7) would return the value of -105 (which is equal to -7 x -5 x -3 x -1), while =FACTDOUBLE(-6) would return the #NUM! error because -6 is a negative even integer.

Combining Excel Functions with FACTDOUBLE: Tips and Tricks

Excel’s FACTDOUBLE function can be used in combination with other Excel functions to perform complex calculations. One example is combining it with the SUM function to find the sum of the double factorials of two or more numbers.

For example, =SUM(FACTDOUBLE(4), FACTDOUBLE(6)) would return the value of 56 (which is equal to 8 + 48).

All About Double Factorials: Understanding Excel’s FACTDOUBLE Function

A double factorial is a mathematical concept that involves multiplying every other number starting from either 1 or 2 up to a given number. Excel’s FACTDOUBLE function calculates the double factorial of a number.

For example, the double factorial of 5 is calculated as 5 x 3 x 1, which equals 15. Therefore, =FACTDOUBLE(5) would return the value of 15.

Calculating Double Factorial with Excel’s FACTDOUBLE Function: Examples and Applications

The FACTDOUBLE function in Excel can be used to calculate the double factorial of a number. One practical application of this function is in probability theory, where double factorials are used to calculate probabilities for certain events.

For example, to calculate the probability of selecting 3 items out of 7, you can use the formula: =FACTDOUBLE(7) / (FACTDOUBLE(3) * FACTDOUBLE(4)) which would return the value of 0.02381.

Dealing with Non-integer Inputs in Excel’s FACTDOUBLE Function

Excel’s FACTDOUBLE function only works with positive integers. If you try to use it with non-integer values, it will return the #NUM! error. To deal with non-integer inputs, you can use the INT function to round down to the nearest integer.

For example, =FACTDOUBLE(INT(5.8)) would return the value of 15 (which is equal to the double factorial of 5).

The Limitations of Excel’s FACTDOUBLE Function: What Happens When You Exceed the Maximum Value?

Excel’s FACTDOUBLE function has a limitation due to the maximum precision that can be handled by Excel. If you try to calculate the double factorial of a number greater than approximately 170, it will return the #NUM! error.

For example, =FACTDOUBLE(171) would return the #NUM! error because it exceeds the maximum value that can be calculated by Excel.

Using Cell References with Excel’s FACTDOUBLE Function: Best Practices

You can use cell references as arguments with Excel’s FACTDOUBLE function. It’s best practice to use absolute cell references when referencing a constant value and relative cell references when referencing a changing value.

For example, if cell A1 contains the value 5, you can use =FACTDOUBLE($A$1) to reference the value in A1.

Rounding the Results of Excel’s FACTDOUBLE Function: How To Do It Right

If you want to round the results of Excel’s FACTDOUBLE function to a specific number of decimal places, you can use the ROUND function. You can specify the number of decimal places you want to round to as the second argument.

For example, =ROUND(FACTDOUBLE(4), 2) would return the value of 8.00 (which is equal to 4 x 2 rounded to two decimal places).

Error Handling Strategies for Excel’s FACTDOUBLE Function: Lessons Learned

There are several error handling strategies that you can use with Excel’s FACTDOUBLE function. One approach is to use the IFERROR function to replace any error values with a custom message or value.

For example, =IFERROR(FACTDOUBLE(-6), “Invalid Input”) would return the text “Invalid Input” because -6 is an invalid input for the FACTDOUBLE function, resulting in the #NUM! error.

Incorporating Excel’s FACTDOUBLE Function Into VBA Code: Advantages and Limitations

Excel’s FACTDOUBLE function can be incorporated into VBA code to perform complex calculations automatically. However, it’s important to keep in mind that the function can only handle input values up to a certain limit due to Excel’s precision limitations.

For example, the following VBA code calculates the double factorial of a given number:





Public Function DoubleFactorial(Number As Integer) As Integer
  DoubleFactorial = 1
  For i = Number To 1 Step -2
    DoubleFactorial = DoubleFactorial * i
  Next i
End Function

Creating Custom Functions That Utilize Excel’s FACTDOUBLE Function: Tips and Tricks

You can create custom functions in Excel that utilize the FACTDOUBLE function. This can be helpful when you frequently perform specific calculations that involve double factorials.

For example, the following custom function calculates the probability of selecting a certain number of items from a larger set:





Public Function Probability(Selection As Integer, Total As Integer) As Double
  Probability = FactDouble(Total) / (FactDouble(Total - Selection) * FactDouble(Selection))
End Function

Alternatives to Excel’s FACTDOUBLE Function: Pros and Cons

Although Excel’s FACTDOUBLE function is a useful tool for calculating double factorials, there are alternative methods you can use. One option is to use loops or recursion in programming languages such as Python or Java.

Pros of using an alternative method include greater flexibility and precision, while cons may include a steeper learning curve and the need for additional software.

For example, here’s how to calculate the double factorial of a number using recursion in Python:





def factDouble(n):
    if n == 0 or n == 1:
        return 1
    else:
        return n * factDouble(n-2)

print(factDouble(6))  # returns 48

Excel’s FACTDOUBLE Function in Statistical Analysis and Probability Theory: An Overview

Excel’s FACTDOUBLE function can be used in statistical analysis and probability theory to calculate probabilities for certain events. For example, it can be used to find the probability of selecting a certain number of items from a larger set.

In addition, the function can be used in conjunction with other statistical functions in Excel, such as BINOM.DIST and POISSON.DIST, to perform more complex calculations.

For example, =BINOM.DIST(3, 10, FACTDOUBLE(10)/(FACTDOUBLE(3)*FACTDOUBLE(7))) would return the value of 0.1176, which represents the probability of selecting exactly three items out of 10.

Excel’s FACTDOUBLE Function vs. Similar Functions in Other Software: How They Compare

Excel’s FACTDOUBLE function is similar to other functions that calculate factorials or double factorials in other software programs, such as MATLAB or R. However, the syntax and capabilities of these functions may differ.

For example, in MATLAB, the double factorial of a number can be calculated using the “dfactorial” function, which is similar to Excel’s FACTDOUBLE function. The syntax is: dfactorial(n).

Boosting Your Excel Skills: Mastering the FACTDOUBLE Function

To master the FACTDOUBLE function in Excel, it’s important to understand its syntax, input values, and limitations. One way to improve your skills is to practice using the function with different numbers and in combination with other Excel functions.

Another helpful strategy is to use online resources such as tutorials, forums, and videos to learn from experts and other Excel users.

Frequently Asked Questions About Excel’s FACTDOUBLE Function: Everything You Need to Know

Here are some frequently asked questions about Excel’s FACTDOUBLE function:

  • What is the difference between the FACT and FACTDOUBLE functions?
  • Can negative numbers be used as arguments with the FACTDOUBLE function?
  • How do you round the results of the FACTDOUBLE function to a specific number of decimal places?
  • What happens if the input value exceeds Excel’s precision limit when using the FACTDOUBLE function?
  • Can the FACTDOUBLE function be used in VBA code?
  • How do you create a custom function that utilizes the FACTDOUBLE function in Excel?

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