Excel INT function

What is INT function in Excel?

The INT function is one of the math functions of Excel.

It Rounds a number down to a Nearest integer.

We can find this function in Math & trig of insert function Tab.

Table of Contents

How to use INT function in excel

  1. Click on an empty cell (like F5 )
empty cell in excel

2. Click on the fx icon (or press shift+F3)

fx icon in excel

3. In the insert function tab you will see all functions

insert function tab in excel

4. Select math and trig category

5. Select INT  function

6. Then select ok

math and trig function category excel

7. In the function Arguments Tab you will see the INT function

8. In the number section you can enter the value to round (for example 1.5)

9. If you enter +1.5  result will be 1

int function in excel

10. If you enter 2.5 result will be 2

int function in excel

11. If you enter -1.5  result will be  -2

int function in excel

12. If you enter -2.5 result will be -3

int function in excel

13. You will see results in the formula result section

Examples of INT function in excel

  1. =INT(3.14) This formula returns 3 as the integer part of the number 3.14.
  2. =INT(-3.14) This formula returns -4 as the integer part of the number -3.14.
  3. =INT(TODAY()) This formula returns the current date as an integer.
  4. =INT(“5.25”) This formula returns 5 as the integer part of the string “5.25”.
  5. =INT(7/3) This formula returns 2 as the integer part of the result of dividing 7 by 3.
  6. =INT(A1) Assuming that A1 contains a decimal number, this formula returns the integer part of that number.
  7. =INT(SUM(A1:A5)) Assuming that cell range A1:A5 contains decimal numbers, this formula returns the sum of their integer parts.
  8. =IF(INT(A1)=A1,”Integer”,”Decimal”) Assuming that A1 contains a number, this formula returns “Integer” if it is an integer and “Decimal” otherwise.
  9. =INT(RAND()*10) This formula returns a random integer between 0 and 9.
  10. =INT(LOG10(A1)) Assuming that A1 contains a positive number, this formula calculates its logarithm base 10 and returns the integer part of the result.

Example 1:

How to use INT function in excel

You can see examples of INT function below:

int(2.4) ----->>>>answer is  2

int(1.4) ----->>>>answer is  1

int(0) ----->>>>answer is    0

int(-1.6) ----->>>>answer is  -2

int(-2.6) ----->>>>answer is  -3

“Excel’s INT Function: Your Ultimate Guide”

The INT function in Excel is a powerful tool that allows you to round a given number down to the nearest integer. This function is useful in many different scenarios, such as when you need to work with whole numbers or when you want to simplify your data. To use the INT function in Excel, simply type “=INT(number)” into a cell or formula bar, where “number” is the value you want to round down.

For example, if you have a spreadsheet that contains a list of prices for different items, and you want to round these prices down to the nearest dollar, you can use the INT function with a simple formula like “=INT(A1)”, where A1 is the cell containing the price.

“How to Use Excel’s INT Function to Round Down Numbers”

Using the INT function in Excel is a straightforward process. The function takes one argument, which is the number you want to round down to the nearest integer.

To use the INT function, you can type “=INT(number)” into a cell or formula bar, where “number” is the value you want to round down.

For example, if you have a column of sales figures in a spreadsheet that you want to round down to the nearest thousand dollars, you can use the INT function with a formula like “=INT(A1/1000)*1000”, where A1 is the cell containing the sales figure. This formula divides the sales figure by 1000, rounds it down to the nearest integer using the INT function, and then multiplies it by 1000 to get the rounded value.

“Syntax of Excel’s INT Function: What You Need to Know”

The syntax of the INT function in Excel is very simple. The function takes one argument, which is the number you want to round down to the nearest integer.

To use the INT function, you can type “=INT(number)” into a cell or formula bar, where “number” is the value you want to round down.

For example, if you have a column of decimal numbers in a spreadsheet, and you want to round these numbers down to the nearest integer using the INT function, you can use a formula like “=INT(A1)”, where A1 is the cell containing the decimal number. This formula will round the number down to the nearest integer.

“Rounding Negative Numbers in Excel Using the INT Function”

The INT function in Excel can be used to round negative numbers as well as positive ones. When the INT function encounters a negative number, it rounds the number down towards negative infinity.

For example, if you have a column of negative numbers in a spreadsheet that you want to round down to the nearest integer using the INT function, you can use a formula like “=INT(A1)”, where A1 is the cell containing the negative number. This formula will round the number down towards negative infinity. If A1 contains the value -3.4, the formula will return -4 as the rounded value.

“Using Excel’s INT Function to Round Decimal Numbers”

The INT function in Excel can be used to round decimal numbers down to the nearest integer. To use the INT function, you can type “=INT(number)” into a cell or formula bar, where “number” is the value you want to round down.

For example, if you have a column of decimal numbers in a spreadsheet that you want to round down to the nearest integer using the INT function, you can use a formula like “=INT(A1)”, where A1 is the cell containing the decimal number. This formula will round the number down to the nearest integer.

“Case-Sensitivity of Excel’s INT Function: Explained”

The INT function in Excel is not case-sensitive. This means that you can type the function name in uppercase or lowercase letters and it will still work the same way.

For example, if you want to use the INT function to round a number down in Excel, you can type “=int(number)” or “=INT(number)” and both formulas will produce the same result.

“Understanding the Arguments of Excel’s INT Function”

The INT function in Excel takes one argument, which is the number you want to round down to the nearest integer.

To use the INT function, you can type “=INT(number)” into a cell or formula bar, where “number” is the value you want to round down.

For example, if you have a column of sales figures in a spreadsheet that you want to round down to the nearest thousand dollars using the INT function, you can use a formula like “=INT(A1/1000)*1000”, where A1 is the cell containing the sales figure. This formula divides the sales figure by 1000, rounds it down to the nearest integer using the INT function, and then multiplies it by 1000 to get the rounded value.

“Excel’s INT Function with Arrays: A Comprehensive Guide”

The INT function in Excel can be used with arrays to round down multiple numbers at once.

To use the INT function with arrays, you can type “=INT(array)” into a cell or formula bar, where “array” is a range of cells containing the numbers you want to round down. When you press enter, Excel will return an array of rounded values.

For example, if you have a range of cells A1:A5 containing decimal numbers that you want to round down to the nearest integer using the INT function, you can use a formula like “=INT(A1:A5)”, and Excel will return an array of rounded values.

“INT vs ROUND: Which Function to Use When Rounding Numbers in Excel”

In Excel, there are two functions that can be used when rounding numbers: INT and ROUND. The main difference between these functions is that the INT function always rounds a number down to the nearest integer, while the ROUND function can round a number up or down depending on its value.

When working with whole numbers, the INT function is generally preferred because it is a simpler and more efficient way to round down. However, if you need to round a number to a specific number of decimal places, the ROUND function may be more useful.

For example, if you want to round a number down to the nearest integer in Excel, you can use the INT function with a formula like “=INT(A1)”, where A1 is the cell containing the number. If you want to round a number to a specific number of decimal places, you can use the ROUND function with a formula like “=ROUND(A1,2)”, where A1 is the cell containing the number and 2 is the number of decimal places you want to round to.

“Removing Decimals from a Number Using Excel’s INT Function”

Excel’s INT function can also be used to remove decimals from a number. To remove decimals using the INT function, you can divide the number by 1 before applying the function.

For example, if you have a number like 3.14159 that you want to remove the decimals from using the INT function in Excel, you can use a formula like “=INT(3.14159/1)”. This formula divides the number by 1, which results in the same value, but with no decimals. The INT function then rounds the number down to the nearest integer, which is 3.

“Using Excel’s INT Function with Cell References: Step-by-Step Guide”

To use Excel’s INT function with cell references, you can simply replace the “number” argument in the function with a cell reference.

For example, if you have a column of decimal numbers in a spreadsheet that you want to round down using the INT function, you can use a formula like “=INT(A1)”, where A1 is the cell containing the number. When you copy this formula down the column, Excel will automatically update the cell references for each row.

“Highlighting Integer Values with Conditional Formatting and Excel’s INT Function”

Excel’s conditional formatting feature can be used to highlight cells that contain integer values. To do this, you can create a new conditional formatting rule that uses the INT function to check whether a cell contains an integer value.

For example, let’s say you have a range of cells A1:A10 that contains numbers, some of which are integers and some of which are not. To highlight only the cells that contain integers, you can follow these steps:

  1. Select the range A1:A10
  2. Click on “Conditional Formatting” in the “Home” tab
  3. Choose “New Rule”
  4. Select “Use a formula to determine which cells to format”
  5. In the formula box, enter “=INT(A1)=A1”
  6. Choose the formatting style you want to use
  7. Click “OK” to apply the rule

This will highlight only the cells in the range A1:A10 that contain integer values.

“Handling Text Values with Excel’s INT Function: What Happens?”

When you use the INT function in Excel on a cell that contains text, Excel will return the #VALUE! error message. This is because the INT function is designed to work only with numerical values.

For example, if you have a column of cells that contains both numbers and text, and you use the INT function to round the numbers down to the nearest integer, any cells containing text will result in the #VALUE! error.

To avoid this error, you can use the IFERROR function in Excel to handle cases where the INT function encounters non-numerical values.

“Working with Blank Cells in Excel’s INT Function: Tips and Tricks”

When you use the INT function in Excel on a blank cell, Excel will return the #VALUE! error message. To avoid this error, you can use the IF function in Excel to check whether a cell is blank before applying the INT function.

For example, if you have a column of cells that may contain blank cells, and you want to round the non-blank cells down to the nearest integer using the INT function, you can use a formula like “=IF(A1<>””,INT(A1),””)”. This formula checks whether the cell A1 is not blank, applies the INT function to its value, and returns an empty string (“”) if A1 is blank.

“Using the INT Function with Nested Functions in Excel: Examples”

Excel’s INT function can be used as part of a larger formula or nested within other functions. For example, you can use nested functions to round a number down to the nearest hundred or thousand.

For example, if you have a price list in a spreadsheet and you want to round all prices down to the nearest hundred dollars, you can use a formula like “=FLOOR(A1/100,1)*100”, where A1 is the cell containing the price. This formula divides the price by 100, rounds it down to the nearest integer using the FLOOR function, and then multiplies it by 100 to get the rounded value.

“Rounding Up to the Nearest Integer in Excel: CEILING vs INT Function”

While the INT function in Excel always rounds a number down to the nearest integer, the CEILING function can be used to round a number up to the nearest integer or multiple of a specified value.

For example, if you have a column of prices in a spreadsheet and you want to round them up to the nearest dollar, you can use the CEILING function with a formula like “=CEILING(A1,1)”, where A1 is the cell containing the price. This formula rounds the price up to the nearest dollar.

However, if you want to round a number down to the nearest integer, the INT function is still the preferred option.

“Rounding to a Specified Number of Decimal Places in Excel: Limitations of INT Function”

The INT function in Excel always rounds a number down to the nearest integer. If you want to round a number to a specified number of decimal places, you can use the ROUND function instead.

For example, if you have a column of prices in a spreadsheet and you want to round them to two decimal places using the INT function, it will not work because the function always rounds down to the nearest integer. Instead, you can use the ROUND function with a formula like “=ROUND(A1,2)”, where A1 is the cell containing the price. This formula rounds the price to two decimal places.

“Calculating Whole Years Between Two Dates in Excel Using the INT Function”

Excel’s INT function can be used to calculate the whole number of years between two dates. To do this, you can subtract the earlier date from the later date, divide the result by 365, and then apply the INT function.

For example, if you have a spreadsheet with two columns that contain the start and end dates of a project, you can use a formula like “=INT((B1-A1)/365)” to calculate the whole number of years between them. This formula subtracts the start date (A1) from the end date (B1), divides the result by 365 (the number of days in a year), and then rounds down to the nearest integer using the INT function.

“Using Logical Operators with Excel’s INT Function: Real-Life Scenarios”

Excel’s INT function can be used in conjunction with logical operators to create more complex formulas.

For example, let’s say you have a list of sales figures in a spreadsheet and you want to highlight all values that are between $100 and $200. You can use a formula like “=IF(AND(A1>=100, A1<=200, INT(A1)=A1), “Highlight”, “”)”. This formula uses the AND function to check whether the value in A1 is between 100 and 200, and the INT function to check whether it is an integer. If both conditions are true, the cell will be highlighted.

“Converting Time Values to Integers in Excel Using the INT Function”

Excel’s INT function can also be used to convert time values to integers. When you apply the INT function to a time value, Excel converts the time to its decimal equivalent, where one day is represented by the number 1.

For example, if you have a time value like 12:30 PM in cell A1, you can use a formula like “=INT(A1)” to convert it to an integer. The result will be 0.520833333, which represents the fraction of one day that has passed since midnight.

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