Vlookup Concatenate in Excel

Concatenation is the process of combining two or more strings into one. By using concatenation with VLOOKUP, you can create a lookup value that consists of multiple parts, which allows you to perform more complex searches and get more precise results.

For example, let’s say you have a table with employee data, including first names, last names, and job titles. If you want to find the job title for a particular employee, you could use VLOOKUP with a concatenated lookup value that combines the first and last names.

This would allow you to find the exact match for that employee and retrieve their job title.

Using VLOOKUP with concatenation can help you perform more flexible and powerful searches in Excel, especially when dealing with large datasets or complex search criteria.

Here’s a step-by-step guide on how to concatenate with VLOOKUP in Excel.

The CONCATENATE function is used to join two or more text strings into one string. In this case, we will be using it to join multiple columns so that we can use the resulting value as the lookup value for the VLOOKUP function. Here are the steps:

  1. Create a new column to the left of the column you want to perform the VLOOKUP on. Let’s call this column “Concatenate”.
  2. In the first row of the Concatenate column, enter the following formula: =CONCATENATE(B2,” “,C2) Assuming Column B contains First Name and Column C contains Last Name.

This formula joins the values in columns B and C with a space between them.

This will result in a full name.

  1. Copy this formula down the entire length of your dataset. You can do this by clicking on the bottom right-hand corner of the cell containing the formula and dragging it down.
  2. Now that you have a new column that contains the concatenated values, you can use it as the lookup value in your VLOOKUP formula. For example, if you want to look up a job title based on a person’s full name, you could use the following formula in a separate cell:

=VLOOKUP(E2,A:B,2,FALSE)

In this example, E2 is the cell containing the concatenated name you created earlier, A:B is the range of your table where the lookup value and result value reside, 2 indicates that you want to return the second column of the range, and FALSE ensures an exact match.

  1. Copy this formula down the entire length of your dataset. You can do this by clicking on the bottom right-hand corner of the cell containing the formula and dragging it down.

That’s it! By concatenating columns and using the resulting value as your lookup value in a VLOOKUP formula, you can perform more complex searches and get more precise results.

Use CONCATENATE Function For Applying VLOOKUP with Concatenation

Combination of IF, COUNTIF, ROW, INDEX, and SMALL Functions to Concatenate with VLOOKUP

When working with large datasets in Excel, you may find yourself needing to perform complex calculations and lookups that require the use of multiple functions. One such scenario involves searching for a specific value within a table and concatenating it with other values from the same row.

To accomplish this, you can use a combination of several Excel functions including IF, COUNTIF, ROW, INDEX, SMALL, and VLOOKUP.

Here’s an example of how this could work:

Let’s say that you have a table of sales data that includes the salesperson’s name, region, product, and sales amount. You want to create a report that lists the top-selling products by region and salesperson, and also includes a concatenated string that combines the salesperson’s name and region.

To do this, you can use the following formulas:

  1. Use the COUNTIF function to count the number of rows in the table that match the criteria for each region and salesperson. For example, if your table starts at cell A2 and region is in column B and salesperson is in column C, you could use the formula =COUNTIF($B2:2:B100,B2,100,B2,C2:2:C$100,C2) in cell D2 to count the number of rows where the region matches the value in B2 and the salesperson matches the value in C2.
  2. Use the ROW function to generate a unique identifier for each row in the table. This will allow us to return all the relevant data for each top-selling product. For example, you could use the formula =ROW()-1 in cell E2 to generate a unique ID for the first row of the table (assuming the table starts at row 2).
  3. Use the INDEX function to return the value of a specific column in a table based on a given row number. For example, you could use the formula =INDEX($A2:2:D$100,E2,4) in cell F2 to return the sales amount for the row identified by the unique ID in column E.
  4. Use the SMALL function to return the top N values from a range of cells. For example, you could use the formula =SMALL($F2:2:F$100,1) in cell G2 to return the smallest (i.e., top-selling) value from the sales amount column.
  5. Use the VLOOKUP function to look up the salesperson’s name and region based on the unique ID generated in step 2. For example, you could use the formula =VLOOKUP(E2,$A2:2:C100,2,FALSE)&” “&VLOOKUP(E2,A2:2:C$100,3,FALSE) in cell H2 to concatenate the salesperson’s name and region for the row identified by the unique ID in column E.

Finally, you can combine these formulas into a single formula that will return all the relevant data for each top-selling product. For example, you could use the following formula in cell I2:

=IF(F2=SMALL($F2:2:F100,1),VLOOKUP(E2,100,1),VLOOKUP(E2,A2:2:C100,2,FALSE)&” “&VLOOKUP(E2,A2:2:C100,3,FALSE)&” “&VLOOKUP(E2,A2:2:D$100,4,FALSE),””)

This formula checks whether the sales amount in column F is equal to the smallest value in the range F2:F100 (which indicates that this is one of the top-selling products).

If it is, the formula uses the VLOOKUP function to look up the salesperson’s name and region (as concatenated in column H) and the sales amount for that row, and concatenates them into a single string. If it isn’t, the formula returns an empty string (i.e., nothing).

By combining these functions in this way, you can quickly and easily generate a report that lists the top-selling products by region and salesperson, along with the concatenated salesperson name and region.

Run Excel VBA Code to Concatenate with VLOOKUP

Excel VBA (Visual Basic for Applications) is a programming language used to automate tasks and add functionality to Excel spreadsheets. One common task that can be automated using VBA is concatenating data from two or more columns using the VLOOKUP function.

Here’s an example of how this could work:

Let’s say you have two tables – one with customer information and another with order details. The customer table contains the first name, last name, and email address for each customer, while the order table contains the email address and the product ordered.

You want to create a report that lists the product ordered by each customer, along with their full name (i.e., first name and last name).

To accomplish this task using VBA, you would need to write a macro that performs the following steps:

  1. Define the range of cells in the customer table that contains the first name, last name, and email address.
  2. Define the range of cells in the order table that contains the email address and product ordered.
  3. Loop through each row in the order table.
  4. For each row, use the VLOOKUP function to find the customer’s first name and last name based on their email address.
  5. Concatenate the first name and last name into a single string.
  6. Copy the concatenated string and the product ordered to a new worksheet.

Here’s an example VBA code that accomplishes this task:





Sub ConcatenateWithVlookup()
    
    Dim wsCust As Worksheet
    Dim wsOrder As Worksheet
    Dim wsResult As Worksheet
    
    Dim rngCust As Range
    Dim rngOrder As Range
    
    Dim custEmail As String
    Dim custName As String
    
    Set wsCust = Sheets("Customers")
    Set wsOrder = Sheets("Orders")
    Set wsResult = Sheets("Result")
    
    Set rngCust = wsCust.Range("A2:C10") 'Change as necessary
    Set rngOrder = wsOrder.Range("A2:B10") 'Change as necessary
    
    For Each ord In rngOrder.Rows
        custEmail = ord.Cells(1, 1).Value
        custName = Application.WorksheetFunction.VLookup(custEmail, rngCust, 2, False) & " " & _
                   Application.WorksheetFunction.VLookup(custEmail, rngCust, 1, False)
        wsResult.Range("A" & ord.Row).Value = custName
        wsResult.Range("B" & ord.Row).Value = ord.Cells(1, 2).Value
    Next ord
    
End Sub

This code defines three worksheet objects (wsCust, wsOrder, and wsResult) that represent the customer table, order table, and result sheet, respectively.

It also defines two range objects (rngCust and rngOrder) that specify the cells within each table.

The code then loops through each row in the order table (For Each ord In rngOrder.Rows) and performs a VLOOKUP on the customer table using the email address from the order table (custEmail).

The first name and last name are concatenated into a single string (custName) using the & operator. Finally, the concatenated name and product ordered are copied to the result sheet.

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